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Research article - Peer-reviewed, 2017

Effects of dietary yeast inclusion and acute stress on post-prandial whole blood profiles of dorsal aorta-cannulated rainbow trout

Huyben, David; Vidakovic, Aleksandar; Nyman, Andreas; Langeland, Markus; Lundh, Torbjorn; Kiessling, Anders

Abstract

Yeast is a potential alternative to fish meal in diets for farmed fish, yet replacing more than 50 % of fish meal results in reduced fish growth. In a 4-week experiment, 15 rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were cannulated and fed three diets each week: 30 % fish meal as a control (FM); 60 % replacement of fish meal protein, on a digestible basis, with Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SC); and 60 % replacement with Wickerhamomyces anomalus and S. cerevisiae mix (WA). Blood was collected at 0, 3, 6, 12 and 24 h after feeding. In the final week, fish were exposed to a 1-min netting stressor to evaluate possible diet-stress interactions. Significant increases in pH, TCO2, HCO3 and base excess were found after fish were fed the SC and WA diets compared with FM, which elevated blood alkaline tides. Yeast ingredients had lower buffering capacity and ash content than fish meal, which explained the increase in alkaline tides. In addition, fish fed the WA diet had significantly reduced erythrocyte area and fish fed SC and WA diets had increased mean corpuscular haemoglobin levels, indicating haemolytic anaemia. Higher levels of nucleic acid in yeast-based diets and potentially higher production of reactive oxygen species were suspected of damaging haemoglobin, which require replacement by smaller immature erythrocytes. Acute stress caused the expected rise in cortisol and glucose levels, but no interaction with diet was found. These results show that replacing 60 % of fish meal protein with yeasts can induce haemolytic anaemia in rainbow trout, which may limit yeast inclusion in diets for farmed fish.

Keywords

Rainbow trout; Yeast; Aquaculture; Dorsal aorta cannulation; Buffering capacity; Anaemia

Published in

Fish Physiology and Biochemistry
2017, volume: 43, number: 2, pages: 421-434

Authors' information

Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Animal Nutrition and Management
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Animal Nutrition and Management
Nyman, Andreas
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Animal Nutrition and Management
Langeland, Markus
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Animal Nutrition and Management
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Animal Nutrition and Management
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Animal Nutrition and Management

Associated SLU-program

Future Agriculture (until Jan 2017)
Future Animal Health and Welfare (until Jan 2017)

UKÄ Subject classification

Fish and Aquacultural Science

Publication Identifiers

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10695-016-0297-0

URI (permanent link to this page)

https://res.slu.se/id/publ/78216