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Research article - Peer-reviewed, 2023

Screening of Spore-Forming Bacteria with Probiotic Potential in Pristine Algerian Caves

Rehamnia, Baraa; Lee, Natuschka M.; Kuktaite, Ramune; Chaouche, Noreddine Kacem

Abstract

Previous microbial studies of subsurface ecosystems like caves focused mainly on the natural biodiversity in these systems. So far, only a few studies focused on the biotechnological potential of microbes in these systems, focusing in particular on their antibacterial potential, antibiotic production, and, to some extent, enzymatic potential.The interest and exploration of biodiversity in subsurface ecosystems have increased significantly during the last 2 decades. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro probiotic properties of spore-forming bacteria isolated from deep caves. Two hundred fifty spore-forming microbes were enriched from sediment samples from 10 different pristine caves in Algeria at different depths. Isolates showing nonpathogenic profiles were screened for their potential to produce digestive enzymes (gliadinase and beta-galactosidase) in solid and liquid media, respectively. Different probiotic potentialities were studied, including (i) growth at 37 degrees C, (ii) survival in simulated gastric juice, (iii) survival in simulated intestinal fluid, and (iv) antibiotic sensitivity and cell surface properties. The results showed that out of 250 isolates, 13 isolates demonstrated nonpathogenic character, probiotic potentialities, and ability to hydrolyze gliadin and lactose in solution. These findings suggest that a selection of cave microbes might serve as a source of interesting candidates for probiotics. IMPORTANCE Previous microbial studies of subsurface ecosystems like caves focused mainly on the natural biodiversity in these systems. So far, only a few studies focused on the biotechnological potential of microbes in these systems, focusing in particular on their antibacterial potential, antibiotic production, and, to some extent, enzymatic potential. This study explores whether subsurface ecosystems can serve as an alternative source for microbes relevant to probiotics. The research focused on the ability of cave microbes to degrade two substrates (lactose and gliadin) that cause common digestive disorders. Since these enzymes may prove to be useful in food processing and in reducing the effect of lactose and gliadin digestion within intolerant patients, isolation of microbes such as in this study may expand the possibilities of developing alternative strategies to deal with these intolerances.

Keywords

subsurface; cave geobiology; gliadinase; beta-galactosidase; lactose; probiotics; antibiotic resistance; spore-forming bacteria; Bacillus; Paenibacillus

Published in

Microbiology Spectrum
2023, Volume: 10, number: 5
Publisher: AMER SOC MICROBIOLOGY

      Sustainable Development Goals

      SDG3 Good health and well-being

      UKÄ Subject classification

      Microbiology

      Publication identifier

      DOI: https://doi.org/10.1128/spectrum.00248-22

      Permanent link to this page (URI)

      https://res.slu.se/id/publ/119337