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Forskningsartikel2022Vetenskapligt granskadÖppen tillgång

Ecological correlates of riverine diatom and macroinvertebrate alpha and beta diversity across Arctic Fennoscandia

Brittain, John E.; Heino, Jani; Friberg, Nikolai; Aroviita, Jukka; Kahlert, Maria; Karjalainen, Satu-Maaria; Keck, Francois; Lento, Jennifer; Liljaniemi, Petri; Mykra, Heikki; Schneider, Susanne C.; Ylikorkko, Jukka

Sammanfattning

Arctic freshwaters support biota adapted to the harsh conditions at these latitudes, but the climate is changing rapidly and so are the underlying environmental filters. Currently, we have limited understanding of broad-scale patterns of Arctic riverine biodiversity and the correlates of alpha- and beta-diversity. Using information from a database set up within the scope of the Arctic Council's Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna Circumpolar Biodiversity Monitoring Plan, we analysed patterns and correlates of alpha- and beta-diversity in benthic diatom and macroinvertebrate communities across northern Norway, Sweden, and Finland. We analysed variation in total beta-diversity and its replacement and richness difference components in relation to location of the river reach and its drainage basin (Baltic Sea in the south, the Barents Sea in the east and the north, and the Norwegian Sea in the west), in addition to climate and environmental variables. In both macroinvertebrates and diatoms, the replacement and richness difference components showed wide variation. For macroinvertebrates, the richness difference component was the more important, whereas for diatoms, the replacement component was the more important in contributing to variation in beta-diversity. There was no significant difference in beta-diversity between the three main drainage basins, but species composition differed among the drainage basins. Based on the richness difference component of beta-diversity, climate variables were most strongly associated with community variation in macroinvertebrates. In diatoms, both environmental and climate variables were strongly correlated with community compositional variation. In both groups, there were also significant differences in alpha-diversity among the three main drainage basins, and several taxa were significant indicators of one of these drainage basins. Alpha diversity was greater in areas with a continental climate, while the oceanic areas in the west harboured greatly reduced flora and fauna. The correlates of biodiversity were relatively similar in macroinvertebrates and diatoms. Climate variables, in particular temperature, were the most strongly associated with biodiversity patterns in the Arctic rivers of Fennoscandia. Sedimentary geology may be associated with increased productivity and, to a lesser extent, with sensitivity to acidification. There was considerable variation in community composition across Arctic Fennoscandia, indicating the necessity of protecting several stream reaches or even whole catchments within each region to conserve total riverine biodiversity. Furthermore, it is likely that the predicted changes in temperature in Arctic areas will influence riverine diversity patterns across Fennoscandia.

Nyckelord

biodiversity; biogeographical patterns; climate; community composition; temperature

Publicerad i

Freshwater Biology
2022, Volym: 67, nummer: 1, sidor: 49-63
Utgivare: WILEY

      SLU författare

    • Globala målen

      SDG15 Skydda, återställa och främja ett hållbart nyttjande av landbaserade ekosystem, hållbart bruka skogar, bekämpa ökenspridning, hejda och vrida tillbaka markförstöringen samt hejda förlusten av biologisk mångfald

      UKÄ forskningsämne

      Ekologi

      Publikationens identifierare

      DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/fwb.13616

      Permanent länk till denna sida (URI)

      https://res.slu.se/id/publ/107866