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Forskningsartikel2012Vetenskapligt granskad

Pilot study of behavior responses in young riding horses using 2 methods of making transitions from trot to walk

Egenvall, Agneta; Eisersiö, Marie; Roepstorff, Lars

Sammanfattning

According to the principles of negative reinforcement, when an aid has been given to an animal, it should be released as soon as the desired response has been achieved, and, if performed well, may be associated with fewer conflict behaviors than otherwise. In riding, pressure in the horse's mouth from the bit is used to give signals to the horse, and both rein tension and patterns of releasing this tension will vary. The aim of this pilot study was to study horse behavior during 2 different methodologies used to shape relatively naive horses to a deceleration signal while making downward transitions from trot to walk. Method I involved relief from rein tension at the first attempt to perform a correct response (M1), and method 2 entailed that rein tension was relieved at the completed correct response (M2). Four horses were ridden by 4 riders over 4 days (I rider each day), and each horse made 10 transitions each day for each method, which produced 320 transitions. Rein tension was recorded, and horse behavior and rider signal behaviors were evaluated from video recordings. Horse behavior was divided into the following 3 different categories: "pushing against the bit," "moving away from the bit," and "decelerating." Linear models were constructed tracking the percent of the transition time that horses demonstrated at least 1 behavior in the "pushing against the bit," "moving away from the bit," and "decelerating" categories, and with random effects for rider, horse, and transition number nested within horse. Fixed effects analyzed were the methods, proportion of the transition time above 30 N for each rein, and the rider signal behaviors. M1 and M2 had on average 19% (standard deviation: 16) and 38% (standard deviation: 23) of the time with >30 N per rein, respectively. In the models for the "pushing against the bit" behaviors, M2 increased rein tension and "exerting pressure on the reins" increased the level of these behaviors. "Releasing pressure" interacted with "pulling back on the reins"; this combination was associated with an increased level of "pushing against the bit" behaviors. The "decelerating" behavior was associated with lower rein tension. In the "decelerating" behavior models, "pulling back on the reins" led to decreased "decelerating" behavior, whereas "still hand" and "releasing pressure" led to increased "decelerating" behavior; however, the interaction "pulling back on the reins" and "releasing pressure" led to decreased "decelerating" behavior. "Moving away from the bit" had no significant determinants. We concluded that fewer "pushing against the bit" behaviors were created by M1 and that a lower rein tension was associated with the "decelerating" behavior. Reinforcing the horse's attempts, to assist in finding the correct response, benefits the welfare of the horse, and importance of a light hand should be continuously emphasized during riding education. (C) 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Nyckelord

equine; rein tension; transition; ethogram

Publicerad i

Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research
2012, Volym: 7, nummer: 3, sidor: 157-168 Utgivare: ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC